Resources on String Diagrams, and Adjunctions, and Kan Extensions

I’ve been trying to figure out Kan Extensions

Ralf Hinze on Kan Extensions

https://www.cs.ox.ac.uk/ralf.hinze/Kan.pdf

 

But while doing that I went down a rabbit hole on String Diagrams

This post is the first one on String Diagrams that made sense to me.

https://parametricity.com/posts/2015-07-18-braids.html

I had seen this stuff before, but I hadn’t appreciated it until I saw what Haskell expressions it showed equivalence between. They are not obvious equivalences

This seems like a very useful video on this topic.

https://skillsmatter.com/skillscasts/8807-categories-and-string-diagrams

In Summary, it is an excellent notation for talking about transformations of a long sequence of composed Functors  F G H … into some other long sequence of Functors. The conversion of functors runs from up to down. The composition of functors procedes left to right.  F eta is the fmap of eta, and eta F is eta with the forall’ed type unified to be of the form F a.

Adjunctions L -| R are asymmetric between cups and caps. L is on the left in cups and on the right in caps. That’s what makes squiggles pull straightable

I think I have an interesting idea for a linear algebra library based on this stuff

 

John Baez and Mike Stay’s Rosetta Stone (A touch stone I keep returning to)

math.ucr.edu/home/baez/rosetta.pdf

Dan Piponi gave a talk which is another touch stone of mine that I come back to again and again. There is a set of corresponding blog posts.

Other resources:

NCatLab article

https://ncatlab.org/nlab/show/string+diagram

John Baez hosted seminars

http://www.math.ucr.edu/home/baez/QG.html

Catsters

https://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=50ABC4792BD0A086

 

Dan Marsden’s Article

https://arxiv.org/abs/1401.7220

Marsden and Hinze have been collaborating

events.inf.ed.ac.uk/wf2016/slides/hinze.pdf

https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-30936-1_8

Stephen Diehl on Adjunctions

http://www.stephendiehl.com/posts/adjunctions.html

 

A Section From an old Oregon Programming Language Summer School (a rich set of resources)

 

Marsden and Hinze have been collaborating

events.inf.ed.ac.uk/wf2016/slides/hinze.pdf

https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-30936-1_8

 

Mike Stay doing a very interesting series of Category Theory in Javascript. He uses contracts in place of types. Defeats one of the big points of types (static analysis), but still pretty cool

 

 

I think that about covers everything I know about.

Oh yeah, there is the whole Coecke and Abramsky categorical quantum mechanics stuff too.

Contracts and Category Theory

Contracts are both less cryptic and less impressive than a type system.

A type system somehow proves that things will never happen at compile time. You’ll never get a string when you expected an int or even more powerful facts. Contracts just guarantee that at least if certain problems occur at least the program will freak out and tell you at runtime.

I had been vaguely aware of contracts which I considered to be kind of a band aid Racket thing that is their solution to type safety (besides typed racket), but I did not go into depth. And I kind of viewed the thing more as a methodology for showing loop invariants and algorithmic correctness rather than type correctness. I do not know if this is an accurate portrayal of what is in Racket and I’m pretty sure contracts do not actually originate there (Eiffel?).

Mike Stay (who you may know as the co-author of the Rosetta Stone paper https://arxiv.org/abs/0903.0340)made a bunch of videos which I don’t know how I didn’t come across before (they’re kind of old by skateboarding millennial mountain dew front end developer standards. Did Node even exist? Barely.). Javascript (well maybe after python) was my language of greatest comfort a couple years ago and I would have loved this. I absolutely loved Bartosz Milewski’s Category Theory for Programmer’s series. There is a crap-ton of line noise  that kind of muddies the waters though in javascript. I wonder if it makes sense to me because I mostly already understand what he’s going for from a Haskell context. He has some cool patterns here like using objects as typeclasses/interfaces.

https://jscategory.wordpress.com/

The really neat thing he discusses is higher order contracts which I’d bet is a central piece of contract based programming but I had never gotten that far.

I’m still skimming over the vids, but nice job.